The Construction of Social Reality by John Rogers Searle

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The Construction of Social Reality Read Online Free - This short treatise looks at how we construct a social reality from our sense impressions; at how, for example, we construct a 'five-pound note' with all that implies in terms of value and social meaning, from the printed piece of paper we see and touch.

"John Searle has a distinctive intellectual style. It combines razor-sharp analysis with a swaggering chip-on-the-shoulder impudence that many of his opponents might find intolerably abrasive were it not for the good humour that pervades all he writes. This is a man who likes a good philosophical brawl." --New Scientist



Title : The Construction of Social Reality
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 0684831791
Edition Language : English
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 256 pages


Reviews


Marc rated it ★★☆☆☆

May 23, 2015

Really disappointing although possibly my fault in a bad choice. I had assumed this was going to be an argument about how everything we take as reality is in fact a construction of mind and language. But it posited that there are a group of 'brute facts' that exist with or without there being any...


Theresa rated it ★★★★☆

January 21, 2011

I found this to be an intriguing counterpoint to the social constructionism of the 80s and early 90s. Read in juxtaposition to Latour and in conjunction with Hacking, I think that Searle makes an interesting argument. This might be a bit "dated" by now, but if you're going to read Latour and Wool...


Leo rated it ★★★★☆

February 13, 2013

My first contact with Searle, or at least the first time I actually read a text by Searle, was roughly a year and a half ago, when I was attending a philosophy class where we were supposed to write an essay on a subject of our own choosing in the area of the philosophy of mind. I had gotten inter...


Tyler rated it ★★★★☆

December 14, 2009

How can ideas that depend upon the human mind be said to be true? Does there even exist such a thing as social facts? Many thinkers have doubted it, but only now has a philosopher taken the question up. John Searle shows here how ontologically subjective concepts can be objective facts. Intention...


Chad rated it ★★★★☆

July 01, 2014

Post-Modernism got you down? Are your friends speaking of "truth" in the plural? If so, Searle has the answer for you! All kidding aside, the book indirectly addresses prevailing viewpoints of post-modernism and post-structuralism as aforementioned. The book begins with Searle making the distinct...


Blyden rated it ★☆☆☆☆

January 16, 2014

The Social Construction of Reality, a sociology of knowledge by Peter Berger and Thomas Luckmann which explained the existence of social facts, social objects, and social institutions from a phenomenological and broadly symbolic interactionist perspective, with a focus on the importance of langug...


IWB rated it ★★★☆☆

April 30, 2008

In this book, Searle's project is to give an account of the existence of social phenomena in a one-world ontology; that is, an ontology that presupposes naturalism. His project is descriptive insofar as he attempts to explain how social fact (y) is derived from or constructed “on top” of brute fa...


Alex rated it ★★★★☆

June 18, 2017

I don't dive into many books on philosophy, but this one was recommended by a friend. Said he was assigned it in a grad-level History of Psychology class. And while this book is very relevant to that particular science, it applies to... nearly everything. At a critical level, all I can really say...


Andrew rated it ★★★★☆

June 22, 2017

In his book, Searle proposes a general theory of institutional facts and how they interact to form social reality. In the first few chapters he lays out preliminary philosophical groundwork. Then he proposes his general theory and addresses a set of common objections. In the last few chapters he...


Eduardo rated it ★★★☆☆

July 06, 2017

John Rogers Searle basically argues against the postmodern view that "all of reality is somehow a human creation, that there are no brute facts" (p. 2). Searle puts forward some insteresting arguments to demonstrate that "there are facts in the world that make our statements true and that stateme...





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