Seven Fallen Feathers: Racism, Death, and Hard Truths in a Northern City by Tanya Talaga

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Seven Fallen Feathers: Racism, Death, and Hard Truths in a Northern City Read Online Free - Finalist, 2017 Hilary Weston Writers’ Trust Prize for Nonfiction

In 1966, twelve-year-old Chanie Wenjack froze to death on the railway tracks after running away from residential school. An inquest was called and four recommendations were made to prevent another tragedy. None of those recommendations were applied.

More than a quarter of a century later, from 2000 to 2011, seven Indigenous high school students died in Thunder Bay, Ontario. The seven were hundreds of miles away from their families, forced to leave home and live in a foreign and unwelcoming city. Five were found dead in the rivers surrounding Lake Superior, below a sacred Indigenous site. Jordan Wabasse, a gentle boy and star hockey player, disappeared into the minus twenty degrees Celsius night. The body of celebrated artist Norval Morrisseau’s grandson, Kyle, was pulled from a river, as was Curran Strang’s. Robyn Harper died in her boarding-house hallway and Paul Panacheese inexplicably collapsed on his kitchen floor. Reggie Bushie’s death finally prompted an inquest, seven years after the discovery of Jethro Anderson, the first boy whose body was found in the water.

Using a sweeping narrative focusing on the lives of the students, award-winning investigative journalist Tanya Talaga delves into the history of this small northern city that has come to manifest Canada’s long struggle with human rights violations against Indigenous communities.



Title : Seven Fallen Feathers: Racism, Death, and Hard Truths in a Northern City
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 1487002262
Edition Language : English
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 376 pages


Reviews


Ben rated it ★★★★★

October 11, 2017

Seven Fallen Feathers: Racism, Death, and Hard Truths in a Northern City is one of those books I wish didn’t exist but am so grateful it does. Over the past few years, I’ve seen my city come up in the national media from time to time—and often related to Indigenous issues, such as the deaths or i...


Krista rated it ★★★★☆

November 16, 2017

To understand the stories of the seven lost students who are the subjects of this book, the seven “fallen feathers”, you must understand Thunder Bay's past, how the seeds of division, of acrimony and distaste, of a lack of cultural awareness and understanding, were planted in those early days, a...


Chris rated it ★★★★★

October 19, 2017

Disclaimer: ARC via Netgalley Tamra Jewel Keepness. Name doesn’t ring a bell to many people here in the United States. In 2004, the five-year member of Whitebear First Nation went missing from her family home in Reinga. She has never been found. I only know about because I was in Montreal shortly...


Kate rated it ★★★★★

December 26, 2017

Hands down one of the most important nonfiction books I have ever read. It's also one that I encourage every single resident of the US and Canada to read, whether or not it's a book you WANT to read. While it is about the Seven Fallen Feathers (mysterious deaths of Indigenous teens in Thunder Bay...


❀ Susan rated it ★★★★☆

February 04, 2018

https://ayearofbooksblog.com/2018/02/... As part of the Canada Reads 2018 long-list, Fallen Feathers: Racism, Death and Hard Truths in a Northern City is truly an eye-opening account of racism and the terrible loss of 7 indigenous young adults. These deaths occurred between 2000 and 2011 in Thunde...


Emmkay rated it ★★★★☆

January 15, 2018

Many First Nations teens in Northern Ontario have to move to the city of Thunder Bay for high school, which is largely only available via distance education in their remote communities. Away from their homes in a city pock-marked by racism, grappling with the multigenerational effects of colonial...


Julie rated it ★★★★★

October 23, 2017

Seven Fallen Feathers is the most powerful, thought provoking, soul crushing book I’ve read this year and every Canadian should read it. When I was young very young I would overhear things said about Indigenous people, too young to understand any of it or its implications. Ugly comments being whi...


Alexander rated it ★★★★☆

November 02, 2017

Here we are again: race relations in Thunder Bay. I’m really having a hard time determining where to start with this one, and probably not just because of its sensitive nature, but because of the uneasy feeling I’m left with when I dwell on it for too long. I think it has a lot to do with terribl...


Louise rated it ★★★★★

December 05, 2017

I never thought of Canada as a racist country. I've never been so wrong. This book made me incredibly sad, and angry, and disappointed in my country.


Biblio rated it ★★★★★

January 16, 2018

Every Canadian should read this. It's disorientating to read something so real, that happened in real life and is still happening today. The racism native folks experience every day is heartbreaking for everyone involved and for those who only know it exists. It's terrorizing for folks on the rec...





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